What questions can I ask? What are the best questions to ask?

What questions can I ask?

A good concept to take away and put into practice is that you can always get some information about the problem you're facing, even within the karmic limits of what's ok to ask!
FULL TRANSCRIPT

Shannon Walbran
How can we form or compose a question that is answerable, using this tool?

Christine
That's a difficult question. Can you say that again, Shannon? I need to think about that.

Shannon Walbran
It is where everybody gets hung up. That's why I didn't I didn't put that as the first question at all in our dialogue. How can you compose a question that is answerable using this tool? Let's say that you're driving, and you see a red light or a red robot, and it has red, yellow, and green. That red robot can only give you three answers. It can only give you red, yellow, or green, right? It's limited in its answers. What you do with that is up to you, you can drive through the red light if you want to. Or you can stop at the green if you want everybody to hoot at you. But that tool can only give you three answers. How many answers can a coin give you, if you flip a coin?

Christine
I'm guessing three: my reaction, and the heads or the tails. Yeah?

Shannon Walbran
Yeah, you're right. I was just going to say two: it's heads or tails. But there's heads or tails, and then there's what you make of it. That's true. There are three. Cards are repetitive and limited, but you have 50 or 44 in the deck. But what kind of a question can you ask it? A coin, you're really only asking a yes or no question.

Christine
An open question, I guess.

Shannon Walbran
It's openER.

Christine
Yeah. A "how," or a "why" or a "when" or a "what" question instead of a "do" or "should?" Those kinds of questions?

Shannon Walbran
You're on the right track. The best way to ask a question for the cards to help you with is a simple formula with just a few parts in it. The best question is an "I" question. It can't really be a question about "them," my landlord, my ex, my boss, any of those other people. It's outside of our karmic boundaries to ask questions that start with "they," or "he." The only person that you could possibly ask about would be your own child, but in the parameters of "How can I help this child? Does this child need to take dance classes? Or is this child allergic to milk?" or things that you would be able then to take care of.

Then the next part is a present tense, immediate and doable action. That sounds a little bit simple, but it's not. A present tense, doable action: it's like, "Should I go for a run?" You can run, you like to run, it's doable for you. And it's a present tense thing. The one that I often say out loud is, "Should I move to Japan in 25 years?"

Christine
Yeah.

Shannon Walbran
That's a long time from now, isn't it?

Christine
Far in the future.

Shannon Walbran
A lot of things are going to change in the next 25 years. Look at the past year, we don't even know, we couldn't even anticipate any of these things happening to us, limiting our travel...

The last part is for us to give a list of options. Like I should go for a run, I should go for a run maybe later in the afternoon. Okay, it's raining, I'll go for a run after it stops raining, or I shouldn't go for a run, then moving on to, I should do my homework. I should prep cook for the week, I should do this other thing. So we're giving possibilities, always leaving room for the "other," always leaving room for "E. Not Enough Information. D. None of the Above."

Christine
Multiple choice!

Shannon Walbran
Let's take it all the way back to the beginning. We've got the "I," we've got the present tense, doable action. At the beginning, it's a "Can I, Should I, How can I...?"

Christine
Okay

Shannon Walbran
But it can't be a "Will....?" Because that implies that the future is written in stone.

Christine
Yeah, that makes sense.

Shannon Walbran
The last one that it can't be, which is a little bit hard for people to handle and there is a workaround, but is "When?"

Christine
Mm-hmm. Time is loose concept.

Shannon Walbran
"How long will I be staying living in this house?" I'm renting this house. I could say "How long should I stay in this house? Should I plan to stay here for the next three months, six months?" But that's not entirely in my hands is it? Because my landlord could call me tomorrow and say that she needs the house back and she could give me the notice that we've agreed on. But "a tall, dark, handsome stranger" is the worst cliche of a psychic reading ...

Christine
[Laughs} I'm still waiting!


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